History Browser

Search Results

Sir Ernest MacMillan Recalls Being a POW

Type: Sound

They called it "The Great War" and "The War to End All Wars" – though of course it didn't. When hostilities erupted in Europe in 1914, Canadians rushed to Britain's side. But the cost was terrible: more than 60,000 were killed, 172,000 wounded. There are no more Canadian combat veterans alive to recall the horrors of the First World War, but their voices and memories live on in the archives of the CBC. Lest we forget, here are some of their stories.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canadian POWs

Type: Document

During the First World War nearly 3,000 Canadians became prisoners of war.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Armed Forces: Canadian Prisoners of the Axis Powers - Canada and the war - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Almost 9,000 members of Canada’s armed forces became prisoners of the enemy during World War II, as well as several hundred Canadian civilians. Undernourishment and boredom were the prisoners' great enemies. There were worries at home about prisoners in the deteriorating conditions of 1945, but nearly all were liberated by the advancing Allied armies, including the Russian Red Army, or freed themselves when the enemy surrendered.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Invasion of Poland, 1939 - Operations - Democracy at War

Type: Document

Hitler's invasion of Poland triggered the beginning of the Second World War after which France, Great Britain, and Canada declared war on Germany. The first movements of these forces were discussed in newspaper articles of the day.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Harsh Terms of Surrender

Type: Document

Since the fortifications of Montreal were too weak to withstand a siege by the British in September 1760, French commanders Vaudreuil and Lévis were forced to surrender. The terms were harsh, with the defenders being refused the honours of war.

Site: National Defence

VE-Day Countdown: 'This Country of Unspeakable Evil'

Type: Film and Video

Seasoned war reporter Matthew Halton of the CBC is staggered by the sight of prisoners -- "bags of bones" -- in liberated Nazi prison camps. In labour camps, prisoner-of-war camps and political prisons, enemies of the Nazi regime have been starved, tortured and murdered -- atrocities that have shocked the rest of the world.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Treatment Of Prisoners

Type: Document

One problem of raid warfare was the treatment of prisoners - they were often brutally tortured, as was the custom of the Amerindians. This was ironic, as the Canadians themselves had suffered badly this way from the Iroquois.

Site: National Defence

The Second World War

Type: Document

When Canada join World War II, the nursing service was expanded to all three branches of the military; Navy, Army and Air Force. Each branch had its own distinctive uniform and working dress, while all wore the Nursing Sister's white veil and were commissioned officers. The Sisters travelled overseas by ship in convoys, running the gauntlet of German submarine action in the North Atlantic.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

The Americans Repulsed

Type: Document

During the battle of New Year's Eve of 1775, a column of American rebels led by General Arnold made one last attack on Quebec City. Arnold was wounded and many of his men captured when British governor Carleton attacked the rebels from behind.

Site: National Defence

Another Round Of Iroquois Wars

Type: Document

The Iroquois pressed their advantage, raiding and spreading fear among the colonists. A French attempt to force a pitched battle was unsuccessful.

Site: National Defence