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Japanese Internment Re-examined

Type: Film and Video

Debunking of myth of threat posed by Japanese-Canadians during the Second World War, through interviews with both government officials and victims of internment. Argument that it was in fact the very act of resettling and interning Japanese-Canadians that could have alienated them enough to pose a threat in case of Japanese invasion of the Pacific coast.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Japanese Canadians: Redress Opposition

Type: Film and Video

Canadian war veterans discuss and explain the reasons behind their opposition to reparations for Japanese-Canadians.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Auschwitz: Hana's Suitcase Turns out to be a Replica

Type: Film and Video

The Auschwitz Museum admits the original suitcase was destroyed in a fire.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

1988: Government apologizes to Japanese Canadians

Type: Film and Video

A formal apology and financial compensation package is passed into law for the Japanese-Canadian community, to redress their internment and relocation during the Second World War.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Auschwitz : Protesting Hatred

Type: Film and Video

Six decades after Auschwitz was liberated, the biggest and most brutal Nazi death camp remains a potent symbol of terror and genocide. More than a million Jews were murdered there, as well as tens of thousands of Poles, Gypsies and Soviet prisoners of war. When Allied soldiers liberated the complex in Poland in January 1945, they found skeletal prisoners, mounds of corpses, gas chambers and cooling crematoria. Survivors scattered, many to Canada, to rebuild their lives. But the Nazi atrocities they witnessed have echoed through the years along with the cry "Never again."

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Life After Auschwitz

Type: Film and Video

Six decades after Auschwitz was liberated, the biggest and most brutal Nazi death camp remains a potent symbol of terror and genocide. More than a million Jews were murdered there, as well as tens of thousands of Poles, Gypsies and Soviet prisoners of war. When Allied soldiers liberated the complex in Poland in January 1945, they found skeletal prisoners, mounds of corpses, gas chambers and cooling crematoria. Survivors scattered, many to Canada, to rebuild their lives. But the Nazi atrocities they witnessed have echoed through the years along with the cry "Never again."

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Japanese Canadian: Celebrating Success

Type: Film and Video

As Canadian soldiers were fighting overseas in the name of democracy, at home the federal government was staging the largest mass exodus in Canadian history. During the Second World War, roughly 22,000 Japanese Canadians were forcibly evacuated from the west coast and resettled in other parts of the country. Their struggle continued after the war as they fought for an apology and redress for their loss. CBC Television and Radio covered the crucial issues in their journey from relocation to redress.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Japanese Canadians: 100 Years in Canada

Type: Sound

As Canadian soldiers were fighting overseas in the name of democracy, at home the federal government was staging the largest mass exodus in Canadian history. During the Second World War, roughly 22,000 Japanese Canadians were forcibly evacuated from the west coast and resettled in other parts of the country. Their struggle continued after the war as they fought for an apology and redress for their loss. CBC Television and Radio covered the crucial issues in their journey from relocation to redress.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Japanese Canadian Internment: Refusing to Comply

Type: Film and Video

The grounds, enclosed with barbed wire, are filled with rows of barracks and nine guard towers. Here, in Angler, Ont., those who resisted evacuation orders have been imprisoned without trial. In this CBC Radio feature, one man recalls his experience. Along with his brother and father, he steadfastly objected to the principle of mass evacuation. Refusing to acquiesce, he was held for four years.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter (1843-1929) - South African War

Type: Document

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter became the first Canadian-born officer to command this country’s military. As commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry in South Africa, his no nonsense, no frills approach to soldiering brought him into conflict with the less disciplined ways of his officers and men, but his austere professionalism got results.

Site: Canadian War Museum