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Carry On Canada! Canadians Urged to Boost War Effort

Type: Film and Video

It starts off as a casual conversation about politics. But by the end of the conversation, both men are convinced: it's time to join the army. "I guess we better swing into line," concedes one of the men in this short radio skit. This dramatized chat is part of the 1941 CBC program Carry On Canada, a weekly show aimed at persuading Canadians to help with the war effort. This episode also includes "a call to every Canadian housewife" to collect unused aluminum and donate it to "your government for war purposes."

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Propaganda and the Second World War

Type: Film and Video

"Buy Victory Bonds!" Spread war-related rumours and you risk becoming "one of Hitler's Little Helpers." Ladies, join the army and you'll be "the proudest girl in the world!" Persuasive messages like these were everywhere during the Second World War, including on CBC Radio and Canadian movie screens. Indeed, wartime propaganda wasn't just the domain of Nazi Germany — Canada too created films, radio dramas and posters aimed at convincing citizens to join the military or help out on the home front.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Patriotism on the Home Front - Second World War- Fighting From the Home Front

Type: Document

Synopsis of television episode on patriotism and government propaganda in Canada during the Second World War. Discusses the sacrifices individuals were expected to make to support the war effort and the introduction of Victory Bonds to support wartime expenditures. This episode is part of the "Canada: A People's History" series. Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Fears of French Fleets

Type: Document

France's 1778 entry into the American Revolutionary War spread fear in several places. The Maritimes worried about a French fleet disrupting shipping in the Gulf of St. Lawrence or attacking Newfoundland. In Quebec, officials worried about Canadian reaction to a French landing.

Site: National Defence

Recruiting Sergeants

Type: Document

Recruiters would entice potential volunteers with false tales of the easy, glorious life they would lead in the military, and told stories of riches to be won. Getting the men drunk also played an important part in recruiting practices.

Site: National Defence

Bringing the War into the Classroom

Type: Film and Video

Combining education and entertainment came naturally to CBC Radio in the 1940s. In classrooms across the country, teachers were tuning in to a new series, the National School Broadcasts. Friday mornings at 10:00, students could hear special newscasts written for classrooms, followed by dramatic stories of Canadian pioneers. In this news segment clip, we hear an explanation of politics in China, and the momentous battles taking place at Stalingrad and Guadalcanal.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Western Thrust Under American General Hull

Type: Document

To the astonishment of the British, the first American attack during 1812 was in the far west from Detroit. An army led by the inexperienced American General Hull, the Governor of Michigan, crossed the border and took the town of Sandwich, Upper Canada, in July 1812

Site: National Defence

Propaganda: 'Hitler's Little Helpers'

Type: Film and Video

"Are you one of Hitler's little helpers?" That's the question posed each week on CBC Radio's Comrades in Arms. The regular segment warns Canadians at home against rumour and gossip that could hurt morale, or aid the enemy. This week: English pilots training in Canada are rumoured to have rejected corn on the cob, thinking it's pigs' feed. If you think they're ungrateful, the show warns, "Remember to think first before you babble!"

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Beaumont-Hamel National Historic Site of Canada: The Price We Paid for Nationhood: Beaumont-Hamel and Vimy Ridge: Lesson Plan

Type: Document

Students are given a variety of sources to help them gain a better understanding of the First World War, and its significant effects on Canadian society and culture. The battlefields and monuments of Vimy Ridge and Beaumont-Hamel, both located in France, were officially declared National Historic Sites of Canada on April 9, 1997.

Site: Parks Canada

Canadians Divided - Some Support for American Revolution in Quebec - The Propaganda War - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

After reading the Continental Congress Manifesto of 1774, urging the people of Quebec to join the Thirteen Colonies in revolt against England, most Canadians chose to stay out of the conflict. But there were some who were eager to join the rebellion, and they tried to persuade their neighbours. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation