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Officer with regimental colour, 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot, 1814

Type: Image

The 1st battalion of the 9th (the East Norfolk) Regiment of Foot was sent from the Duke of Wellington's victorious army in Spain to serve in Canada during 1814-1815. This was not the first time in the country for the regiment, which had been part of Burgoyne's army during the American Revolutionary War. This contemporary illustration shows an officer with the regimental colour (in the regiment's yellow facing colour). The 183 centimetre square colour itself is partially furled to make it easier to carry. Accompanying the officer is a colour-sergeant armed with a spontoon. The rank was created in 1813 as the senior non-commissioned officer in an infantry company. These men had a special duty of protecting the colours in action, and were distinguished with a special rank badge worn on the right arm.

Site: National Defence

Drummer, régiment de Carignan-Salières, 1665-1668

Type: Image

This reconstruction by Michel Pétard shows a drummer of the régiment de Carignan-Salières during the regiment's service in New France. He is wearing the livery of the princes of Carignan. The Carignan coat of arms is painted on his drum; the central shield of the arms shows a white cross on a red field. The drummer's role was to communicate the orders of his commander through patterns of drum beats. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Soldier with regimental colour, régiment de Guyenne, circa 1755-1760

Type: Image

This regimental colour (or 'drapeau d'ordonnance') was carried by the 2nd battalion of the régiment de Guyenne when it was sent to New France in 1755. Note the white cravat tied around the standard pole. This and the white cross were common to all French army colours of the period. The pattern of isabelle (a brownish-yellow) and vert-gris (green-grey) on the colour was the mark of the régiment de Guyenne. This contemporary print shows the regiment's European-pattern uniform, worn in New France by the 2nd battalion from 1757 to 1760. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

John Cabot embarking in full ceremonial garb on the Matthew at Bristol on 20 May 1497

Type: Image

Sailing west from Bristol in the south west of England in May 1497, Cabot sighted land on 24 June. This was probably Newfoundland but also possibly Cape Breton Island. Cabot took possession of his discovery for England, which gave that country its first claim of trans-Atlantic territory.

Site: National Defence

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

La Salle claims Louisiana for France

Type: Image

Robert Cavelier de La Salle is shown taking part in a ceremony where he claimed Louisiana for France on 6 April 1682, after having descended the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico. Even in the wilderness, the ceremony was done in full regalia with all the formalities.

Site: National Defence

Sir James Henry Craig, Governor General of Canada

Type: Image

Craig (1748-1812), was Governor General of Canada from 1807 to 1811. His term was a stormy one, but he had many friends and admirerers in the colony, something shown by the brisk sale in Canada of prints portraying him. Sir James is shown wearing the uniform of a British general, with the star of the Order of the Bath on his breast. (Library and Archives Canada, C-024888)

Site: National Defence

Louis XV, King of France from 1715 to 1774

Type: Image

King Louis XV of France (1710–1774) is shown wearing the royal robes. Around his neck are the collars and insignia of two orders of chivalry - the Spanish Order of the Golden Fleece, and the French Order of Saint-Louis. The white 8-pointed cross of the latter order was awarded to many Canadain soldiers during the French regime in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada, C-000604)

Site: National Defence

Soldier with regimental colour, régiment de Cambis, circa 1758

Type: Image

The 2nd Battalion of the régiment de Cambis was sent to reinforce the garrison of Louisbourg shortly before the fortress was besieged by a large British force. When Louisbourg surrendered, outraged soldiers of this regiment burned their colours rather than surrender them. Note the white cravat tied around the standard pole. This and the white cross were common to all French army colours of the period. The pattern of green and red on the colour was the mark of the régiment de Cambis. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles-Michel d'Irumberry de Salaberry, Canadian Voltigeurs, circa 1813-1815

Type: Image

De Salaberry (1778-1829) was a veteran officer of the British army, with service in the West Indies and the Netherlands. He belonged to one of the most influential families in French Canada. The family enjoyed a long-standing friendship with Prince Edward Augustus, the Duke of Kent and future King William IV. The prince's influence got the young Canadian his first commission, with the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot. De Salaberry raised the Provincial Corps of Light Infantry (Canadian Voltigeurs) in 1812 and won lasting fame in Canada when 300-400 of his troops defeated an American army of over 5,000 men at Châteauguay on 26 November 1813. This engraving, made after the War of 1812, shows de Salaberry in the uniform of an officer of the Canadian Voltigeurs. The circular medal he wears is the Field Officers Gold Medal, a very rare award at the time. This medal of de Salaberry's is in the collection of the Canadian War Museum today. (Library and Archives Canada, C-009226)

Site: National Defence