History Browser

Search Results

Subject > Armed Forces > Military Ceremony and Honours

Organization > Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Saving HMCS Haida

Type: Document

Unlike so many of the Tribals, she was spared from the scrapyard, thanks to the efforts of a private organization, HAIDA Inc. which bought her from the Navy for use as a museum ship.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Service Post-WWII

Type: Document

Converted after the war to a destroyer-escort, (DDE) and bearing the new pennant number 215, HMCS Haida served two tours of duty in Korea.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

HMCS Haida, a Tribal Class destroyer built in England, was commissioned into the Royal Canadian Navy in 1943, serving in many theatres of operation through the Second World War. After a post-war refit, Haida continued in service through Korean War and Cold War situations, until she was decommissioned in 1963. The ship was acquired by the Province of Ontario and moved to Ontario Place (Toronto) in 1971. The ship was designated as a National Historic Site of Canada in 1984 by the federal government, and ownership was transferred to Parks Canada in 2002. HMCS Haida arrived at Pier 9 in Hamilton Harbour on August 30, 2003, the 60th anniversary of her commissioning.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Rescuing Athabaskan Survivors

Type: Document

In late April, on night patrol in the Channel, Haida sank a German destroyer. A few nights later, on April 29th, the 10th Destroyer Flotilla came upon two more German destroyers off the coast of France. Haida and Athabaskan pursued them. Unfortunately, a torpedo struck Athabaskan; there was a tremendous explosion and she began to sink.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Last Remaining Tribal Class Destroyer

Type: Document

When the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada designated Haida as being of national historic significance in 1984, they gave two reasons: because of her role in naval combat, and because she is the last of the Tribal class destroyers.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Built to Canadian Standards

Type: Document

For their time, the Tribals were very sophisticated warships. Well-armed, they were equipped with the most up to date detection and communications technology

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: The Last of the Tribal Destroyers Lesson Plan

Type: Document

Students will learn about the important role HMCS Haida -- the last of the Tribal class destroyers --played during World War II, the Korean War and the Cold War. Students will examine the process for nominating a person of national historic significance in order to ensure important aspects of Canadian history are not forgotten by future generations.

Site: Parks Canada

HMCS Haida National Historic Site of Canada: Haida at War

Type: Document

Haida was a fighting ship, and it didn't matter what came at her: destroyers, armed trawlers, submarines, even trains. Haida and her crews distinguished themselves in every theatre of war and peace in which they played a part.

Site: Parks Canada