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Chapter 4 - Between the Wars 1919-1939

Type: Document

During the inter-war years of 1919-1939 the Canadian military experienced large-scale reorganization which included major diversification and expansion of communications capabilities. In many cases these capabilities would grow to serve civilian as well as military needs and would put the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals in the unique position of being the only branch of the Armed Forces that continued to expand during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

Site: National Defence

Chapter 3 - World War One 1914-1918 - Communications and Electronics Branch

Type: Document

The First World War stimulated a burst of striking new technologies including advances in battlefield communication. This resource describes the successes and failures of this technology and how the organization of forces changed to enable their use.

Site: National Defence

Statue of explorer Pierre Gaultier de La Vérendrye

Type: Image

There is no reliable likeness known of Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de La Vérendrye (1685-1749), the officer who was one of the great explorers of the Canadian west. This statue at the Quebec National Assembly is possibly the best known depiction of him. Here he symbolically looks to the far horizon.

Site: National Defence

Gold Rush Prompts Border Survey

Type: Document

The Fraser River gold rush, starting in 1857, brought changes to the Pacific coast. The flood of American prospectors prompted the British government to take over the region from the Hudson's Bay Company. Royal Engineers were sent to survey the region, especially the border.

Site: National Defence

John Cabot embarking in full ceremonial garb on the Matthew at Bristol on 20 May 1497

Type: Image

Sailing west from Bristol in the south west of England in May 1497, Cabot sighted land on 24 June. This was probably Newfoundland but also possibly Cape Breton Island. Cabot took possession of his discovery for England, which gave that country its first claim of trans-Atlantic territory.

Site: National Defence

La Vérendrye's Sons Continue the Search

Type: Document

Louis-Joseph and François La Vérendrye ventured even farther than their father, reaching as far south as Nebraska and as far west as Wyoming. They were the first Europeans to record seeing the Rocky Mountains in 1743.

Site: National Defence

The Fenians

Type: Document

The end of the American Civil War in 1865 brought a new military problem. There were 10,000 Irish-American veterans who belonged to the Fenians, a well-armed Irish secret society that wanted revenge against Britain. The Fenians planned to invade Canada.

Site: National Defence

Portuguese ships, early 16th century

Type: Image

Such ships would have carried the Portuguese who explored what is now Canada’s east coast. (Museu de Arte Antiguo, Lisbon)

Site: National Defence

Map of La Vérendrye’s western explorations

Type: Image

Pierre Gaultier de Varennes et de La Vérendrye (1685-1749) charted large areas of the Prairies during the 1730s and 1740s, unsuccessfully searching for the fabled Northwest Passage that linked the Atlantic and Pacific oceans.

Site: National Defence

Campaign in North-West Europe - Information from German Sources - Part I - German Defence Preparations in the West

Type: Document

This report is an analysis of the events that led up to the successful Normandy Invasion. Much of the information in the report comes from original German sources.

Site: National Defence