History Browser

Search Results

Subject > Armed Forces > Naval Forces and Merchant Navy

Organization > Canadian War Museum

Battle of the Atlantic - Operations - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The Battle of the Atlantic was the struggle for control of the sea routes between the Americas and Europe and Africa. German forces attempted to break Britain’s vital supply link from the United States and Canada. During this six year conflict both sides suffered losses of personnel and materials.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Canada at D-Day. 1944

Type: Document

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces invaded Western Europe along an 80-kilometre front in Normandy, France. Of the nearly 150,000 Allied troops who landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, 14,000 were Canadians.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Armed Forces: The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The Royal Canadian Navy grew rapidly during the Second World War. The roles it played in military actions ranged from acting as an escort force for merchant ships to fighting German submarines and landing on the coast of German-occupied France as part of major operations. Some of the experiences of the Canadian Navy were recorded in newspapers of the time.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Leading WREN, by war artist Margaret Kathleen MacLeod

Type: Image

An electronic reproduction of the watercolour on paper artwork, "Leading WREN," created by Margaret Kathleen MacLeod.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War and the Foundation of Canada - The Seven Years’ War

Type: Document

During the 1750s, British North American colonies grew to the point that they began to spread into territory already occupied by the French colonies and First Peoples. After the expulsion of British settlers in 1754, an undeclared war broke out between French and British colonies.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the First World War - Canada in World Affairs. 1920-1939

Type: Document

In 1931, Great Britain passed the Statute of Westminster, giving Canada the legal status of an independent country. During the years between the two world wars, Canada avoided overseas military commitments, but began to modernize and re-equip its forces in the mid-1930s in case of another major war.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Shipping and Shipbuilding - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The growth of Canada's shipbuilding industry from three shipyards to 90 plants during the Second World War was documented in newspaper accounts of the day.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Canada's War at sea. 1939-1945

Type: Document

Despite early growing pains, the Royal Canadian Navy grew into a formidable anti-submarine force. The R.C.N. sank 28 enemy submarines and escorted Allied shipping across the Atlantic and along the northeastern seaboard of North America.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the First World War - Canada and the War at Sea. 1914-1918

Type: Document

By 1918, German U-boats lurked off Canada’s east coast. At this time the Royal Canadian Navy was very small. As a result, Great Britain assumed direct responsibility for defending the sea approaches to Canada.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Royal Canadian Navy and the Battle of the Atlantic, 1939-1945

Type: Document

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest campaign of the Second World War and the most important. Canada was a major participant -- this country’s enormous effort in the struggle was crucial to Allied victory. While the ships and personnel of the Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) operated across the globe during the war, they are best remembered for their deeds during the Battle of the Atlantic. Reading list included.

Site: Canadian War Museum